freedom

Miranda v. Arizona: Fifty Years of Silence

In 2016, we celebrated the 50th anniversary of the United States Supreme Court ruling in Miranda v. Arizona and the resulting right to remain silent. How has the Miranda verdict served to shape our justice system over the last fifty years?  Some would say that the decision interferes with the ability of the police to obtain confessions, however, others believe that high-pressure police interrogations have led to many false confessions.  Over the last half-century, studies have shown that the Miranda warning has done no damage to law enforcement, and is in full accordance with the United States Bill of Rights and Constitution.  In this article, the case of Miranda v. Arizona will be examined, along with the cultural and legal effects on our current society. The Crime On March 3, 1963, while returning home from her late night job at a theater in Phoenix, AZ, 18-year old Lois Ann Jameson was attacked. Her assailant forced her into a car while threatening her with a knife, drove to the Arizona desert, sexually assaulted her, took her money, and dropped her off a few blocks from her home.  Later, she described her attacker and his vehicle to detectives. The following week, Jameson’s bother saw the car believed to have been used in the attack, and recorded the license plate number.  The aged green car in the driveway of Twila Hoffman’s house was further investigated and found to be a match from Jameson’s description of the crime.  Ernesto Miranda shared this home with Hoffman, his common-law wife. Ernesto Arturo Miranda, 22, was then accused and arrested by Officer Carrol Cooley for the kidnapping and rape of Lois Ann Jameson. Who Was Mr. Miranda? Ernesto Arturo Miranda, (March 9, 1941- [...]

By | December 28th, 2016|Categories: Criminal Defense|Tags: , , , |Comments Off on Miranda v. Arizona: Fifty Years of Silence

The Best Gadsden Flag Memes

The Gadsden flag was originally designed in 1775 by American general and statesman Christopher Gadsden (1724–1805), and used during the American Revolution. Original Gadsden Flag The origin of the snake theme can be traced back to Benjamin Franklin when-- in 1751-- he made the first reference to the timber rattlesnake in a satirical commentary published in his Pennsylvania Gazette. Benjamin Franklin's "Join or Die" Flag The Gadsden flag has been used over the years for various purposes. It's mostly been used as a statement of personal freedom, American pride, libertarian values, and freedom. The Best Variations of the Gadsden Flag

By | November 11th, 2016|Categories: Criminal Defense|Tags: , |Comments Off on The Best Gadsden Flag Memes

Collecting & Analysing Data To Catch Racist and Violent Cops

Two computer programmers from Seattle-- Eric Rachner and Phil Mocek (blog)-- have used Washington's Public Records Act and their analytic skills to uncover instances and patterns of officer misconduct at the Seattle Police Department, all while the Office of Professional Accountability (OPA) systematically shielded dirty cops from reprimands. Read more at The Stranger and the Sky Valley Chronicle.

By | May 8th, 2015|Categories: Criminal Defense, DUI|Tags: , , |Comments Off on Collecting & Analysing Data To Catch Racist and Violent Cops

Texas Police Officer Kills For Jesus

The Knoxville News Sentinel reports that Patrol Sergeant Charlie Eipper of the Wichita Falls Police Department believes that God, Jesus Christ, and the Scriptures support his use of a rifle and sniper scope to kill anyone he finds threatening, and he's written a book called "Jesus Christ on Killing." Eipper  is quoted as saying, “When Jesus comes back, he will be the man of war. When he comes back, there will be a whole lot of killing going on. Scripture says that (Jesus) is going to be the one doing it. Our Savior will be going to battle. Finally, Israel will see their national salvation occurring.”        

By | July 19th, 2014|Categories: Criminal Defense, DUI|Tags: , , , |0 Comments

Record Exonerations in 2013

A report released February 2014 by the National Registry of Exonerations, a joint project of the University of Michigan Law School and the Center on Wrongful Convictions at Northwestern University School of Law, shows that there were a record number of exoneration nationwide. The number of reported exonerations of people who were wrongfully convicted of a crime they did not commit-- and who served prison time-- rose to 87 in 2013. The previous record was 83 in 2009. Samuel Gross, editor of the National Registry of Exonerations, notes that while the number may seem small, "The great majority of people who are innocently convicted are never exonerated because they are never discovered." More on the report can be read at Here & Now.    

By | March 12th, 2014|Categories: Criminal Defense|Tags: , , , , |0 Comments