drugs

Marijuana Delivery Services in Oregon

Recreational cannabis dispensaries will soon be able to begin marijuana delivery throughout Oregon. Oregonians will be able to call their local dispensary and place an order for marijuana – just like their pizza or Chinese food. Since its legalization in 2015, marijuana has been a controversial subject, with lawmakers scrambling to figure out the fine details of marijuana sales and possession in Oregon. However, Oregonians and Portlanders alike, certainly feel the presence and influence of marijuana in the state. According to Oregon Public Broadcasting (OPB), marijuana sales reached $265 million in 2015. As reported on KGW, multiple dispensaries throughout Oregon have applied for permits to begin servicing customers who place mobile orders for cannabis. The Oregon Liquor Control Commission (OLCC) is still requiring customers to be over the age of 21, and allowing deliveries solely between 8 a.m. and 9 p.m. Additionally, dispensaries will only be allowed to deliver in cities where they are permitted to sell. Oregon will be the first state to allow such a service. Though the service is barely starting, the OLCC is making sure that business have the adequate permits to sell and deliver marijuana. In Portland, there are currently just under 170 dispensaries. The application for home delivery will cost dispensaries $750 and the license will be another $3,500. While marijuana continues to become more accessible to people, it is still unlawful to drive while high in the state of Oregon. With this new delivery service, customers will be able to stay home and get cannabis delivered right to their front door. Driving under the influence of marijuana is still subject to punishment under the law. It’s important to remember that marijuana laws and regulations are constantly changing in [...]

By | 2017-02-22T12:53:49+00:00 February 22nd, 2017|Categories: Criminal Defense, DUI|Tags: , , , |Comments Off on Marijuana Delivery Services in Oregon

DUI and Reaction Times

Most people have heard of the roadside tests administered for DUI investigations. But interestingly enough, the Standardized Field Sobriety Tests (SFSTs) do not directly measure reaction times at all. Why Are Fast Reaction Times Important for Driving? Driving a car may seem simply enough, but it's actually a complex task. In addition to hand-eye-coordination, driving also requires foot-eye-coordination in order to apply acceleration and braking. A driver must be able to swerve or brake quickly to avoid collisions. To do this, the driver needs to be able to have an awareness of distance, speed, and the amount of time needed to slow a vehicle safely without overreacting. How Does Alcohol Affect Reaction Times? Alcohol is a Central Nervous System (CNS) depressant. Because alcohol is water-soluble and can penetrate the blood-brain barrier, the nervous system is a particular target for the negative effects of alcohol. Alcoholism and sustained use of alcohol can have an even greater effect on the brain. Alcohol slows reaction times. Why Don't DUI Field Sobriety Tests Gauge Reaction Times? The three field sobriety tests that are most commonly used by the police in DUI investigations do not specifically test for reaction times. Two of the tests are primarily focused on balance. For example, the Walk and Turn test is very similar to the challenge of walking on a balance beam. Most people can't do this without raising their arms slightly for balance. On the One Leg Stand test, the test subject is supposed to stand on one foot while holding the other leg out in front. Most people can't do this without raising their arms slightly for balance. For both the Walk and Turn and One Leg Stand tests, raising arms for balance [...]

By | 2017-02-22T12:35:07+00:00 February 22nd, 2017|Categories: DUI|Tags: , , , , |Comments Off on DUI and Reaction Times

Forensic Felons: Criminals in the Oregon Crime Labs

Nika Elise Larsen, a forensic scientist and crime scene investigator for Oregon State Police Crime Lab, faced a federal court on Aug. 15, 2016. Larsen pled guilty to tampering with evidence and theft of Schedule II type drugs through direct access to evidence in lockers while working out of Bend and Pendleton Oregon Crime Labs since 2008. Sentencing will commence on Dec. 12, 2016. The prosecution and the defense are recommending a three-year prison sentence. Due to Larsen’s tampering, around 1,500 cases are being reviewed by John Hummel, District Attorney for Deschutes County, Oregon, and by several Deputy District Attorneys. Reportedly, Larsen’s mishandling and tampering of evidence occurred with her own cases and those which she might have accessed in her eight years of employment at OSP. This case is one of several which have cropped up in the last eleven years through mismanagement and lack of oversight at OSP Crime Labs. Jeff Dovci allegedly overstated evidence in a 2005 criminal trial before he retired from the Central Point Oregon Crime Lab in 2013. He is now a private forensic consultant. OSP did an internal investigation and John Hummel found that Dovci had, “overstated scientific findings and minimized things that could have hurt the state’s case.” After reviewing the two cases that came into question, Hummel found that the convictions in question still stood on solid ground. A previous OSP forensic scientist, Kristopher Kyes, missed drugs and other substances in urine he tested at the Clackamas Oregon Crime Lab, which led to a review of 120 cases, 10 of which had potential discrepancies. This led investigators to reevaluate those 10 cases. The troubling trend of misconduct continues with OSP evidence technician, John D. Parrish, who was indicted on June [...]

By | 2016-10-13T00:19:25+00:00 September 14th, 2016|Categories: Criminal Defense, DUI|Tags: , , , , , |Comments Off on Forensic Felons: Criminals in the Oregon Crime Labs

Should I Refuse DUI Tests in Oregon?

Can you refuse Field Sobriety Tests? Field Sobriety Tests in Oregon are considered a search, and you can decline or refuse a search in Oregon. However, your refusal may be used against you in some circumstances. Should I refuse a Field Sobriety Tests? In most cases, yes. This is a complex area of DUI and search and seizure law, but in most cases, a police officer requesting Field Sobriety Tests has already made their mind up. You're going to be arrested for DUI, and therefore they are only gathering more incriminating evidence of the crime of DUI with the FSTs. The FSTs are very difficult tests to perform without error, and anything you do incorrectly or poorly will be used against you to suggest you were drunk. Can you refuse a breathalyzer test? Do I have a right to refuse a breathalyzer test? Yes. Should I take the breathalyzer test? This is a complex area of DUI criminal and administrative law. If at all possible, you should speak with an attorney before refusing a breath test after a DUI arrest. However, if an attorney is not available, the most conservative thing to do is to take the breath test. If you have never had a DUI before, if you do not have a Commercial Driver's License, and if you are otherwise eligible for Oregon's DUI Diversion Program, the criminal charge of DUI will ultimately be eligible for dismissal. Therefore, the BAC reading of your breath test is not terribly important for a first DUI. However, if you have a prior DUI, a CDL, or are otherwise ineligible for diversion, you may want to decline the breath test, limit the government's evidence against you, and preserve any rights you have to challenge [...]

By | 2016-10-13T00:19:28+00:00 August 11th, 2016|Categories: Criminal Defense, DUI|Tags: , , , , , , |Comments Off on Should I Refuse DUI Tests in Oregon?

Tour the 4th Dimension nonprofit sober club – July 16, 2014 – 6:00PM – 7:30PM

From the City Club of Portland website: "4th Dimension is a place for recovery in the real world. It is an alternative social club that is dedicated to bettering the lives of those who inhabit it. Their mission is simple: to provide a safe and fun environment for the recovery community. The 4th Dimension is a recovery and entertainment hang-out for teens and young adults who are recovering from addiction problems. Many of these people still want a social life, but where can they go that doesn't serve alcohol? 4th Dimension is the answer. We will have a tour of the facility and then a discussion with a panel including their Executive Director Winston Murray; Eric Martin, Executive Director of Addiction Counselor Certification Board; Erin DeVet, De Paul Youth Director of inpatient treatment; and people who's lives have been impacted by the program." Advanced M&D 2410 N Mississippi Ave Portland, OR 97227 July 16, 2014 Time: 6:00 PM PST - 7:30 PM PST        

By | 2016-10-13T00:19:30+00:00 July 13th, 2014|Categories: DUI|Tags: , , |Comments Off on Tour the 4th Dimension nonprofit sober club – July 16, 2014 – 6:00PM – 7:30PM

Is Zohydro (hydrocodone bitartrate) legal heroin?

In October of 2013, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved Zohydro ER (hydrocodone bitartrate) for patients with pain that requires daily, around-the-clock, long-term treatment that cannot be treated with other drugs. The active ingredient in Zohydro is the opioid hydrocodone. However, unlike Vicodin, Zohydro can be taken without the threat of severe liver damage, which can occur with medications that combine hydrocodone and acetaminophen. The drug has reportedly been approved in large part on the claim from the Institute of Medicine (IOM) in a report titled "Relieving Pain in America, A Blueprint for Transforming Prevention, Care, Education, and Research" that "100 million people suffer from chronic pain." However, Forbes, MedPage Today, and the Wall Street Journal have all questioned whether that number is accurate, or whether it's exaggerated and misleading. Approximately half of the experts on the IOM panel that produced that report had connections to companies that manufacture narcotic painkillers. From a DUI standpoint, central nervous system depressants like opioids present a problem when the effects of the drugs prevent a driver from being able to operate a vehicle safely. Symptoms or side effects such as drowsiness, respiratory depression, nodding off, and slower reaction times can all increase the risk of an accident, serious physical injury, or even death. From a criminal defense standpoint, this new drug also presents a very high risk for abuse. It's been described as "heroin in a pill." Unlike other prescription opiates, it does not contain safeguards or countermeasures designed to prevent users from crushing the pills for snorting or injecting in a liquid solution. It's unfortunately quite common for some patients addicted to prescription opiates to turn to non-prescription opiates (namely heroin) when either the prescription opiate no longer provides relief (due to tolerance or increased pain), or the [...]

By | 2016-10-13T00:19:30+00:00 July 8th, 2014|Categories: Criminal Defense, DUI|Tags: , , , |Comments Off on Is Zohydro (hydrocodone bitartrate) legal heroin?